My sons, ages 7 and 5, have absolutely no sense of priority. You guys want to check out the cherry blossoms first then go eat lunch, or go eat lunch first and then check out the blossoms?

Actually, I was kind of hungry too.

We could see Kobo-yama from our table in the restaurant. That might have lent some consolation to my wife.
Kobo-yama (弘法山) has two claims to fame. First, it is the home of a tumulus that dates from the late 3rd or early 4th Century. This grave-marking mound of dirt sits near the top Kobo-yama, and bears a resemblance in shape to Kobo-yama itself - at least from this angle. The path to the peak of mighty Kobo runs directly over the top of this tumulus, with no signs screaming out to me in English what I'm actually walking and spitting on.

I didn't realize until after the fact that I was walking on top of a pile of dirt someone made 1,000 years before Columbus set sail. Therefore I have no pictures of it.

That it was eminently unstriking may be of some consolation to you.

Kobo-yama's other point of interest is slightly more apparent, as seen above and below.