Japan's Blind, Limbess Figure of Good Fortune

Spend a little time in Japan and you are bound to come across a peculiar sort of doll, a red and round human-ish creature with no arms or legs. He may or may not have eyes. He sports some pretty fancy facial hair. If you knock him over he’ll bounce back upright. And if you are lucky, he’ll grant your greatest wish.
Japan’s Daruma (達磨) represent perseverance and good luck. Imbued with symbolism, their origins are tied to the highest aspirations of Buddhism. People buy them – and burn them to ashes – every year. A quick peek 1,500 years into the past explains.
 
 
One Woman Gives Us A Clear & Unwitting Clue
Picture
Recognize this castle?

If so, then you (a) live in Japan, (b) have been to Japan, or (c) have some knowledge of Japan.

Or (d) you read Jean Folger's 'The Best Cities To Retire To In Japan', a pile of presumptive rubbish that I recently deconstructed on Jeopardy!

This castle has nothing to do with that article. Rather, this is the exact image that appears after the article, next to the title of another recent Jean Folger fart, 'A Foreigner's Guide to Retiring In Japan'.

In that piece, the Far-East-facing retiree is fed the following inspired morsels:

"While Japan is an easy country to visit..."
-- Easy how? Easy to get to? Easy to get into? This is about as helpful as saying 'The Pacific is an easy ocean to swim in.'